Saturday, April 25, 2015

If I've lost the media . . .

I have made pretty clear my view that the Alabama Supreme Court and Alabama public officials have not been defying federal courts or federal law over same-sex marriage, given the limited scope of district court orders and injunctions. And I thought I had convinced Emily Bazelon when she wrote this, based in part on interviews with  Orin Kerr and with me.

But then on Friday's Slate Political Gabfest, in a preview of next week's Obergefell arguments, Bazelon used the words "rebel" and "defy" to describe recent events in Alabama. Oh well. A subsequent email exchange indicated differences in views about the interaction between the mandamus and the federal injunction and the effect of each on the other. In my view (which I explain further here), the injunction only obligated one probate judge, Don Davis, to issue licenses to the four couples who are plaintiffs in Strawser, which he did. At that point, the mandamus did not impose any obligations on Davis or anyone else that competed or conflicted with obligations from the federal court. We are back to one (functionally) lower federal court disagreeing with another lower federal court about federal law. That is disagreement, not defiance or rebellion.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 25, 2015 at 11:55 AM in Civil Procedure, Constitutional thoughts, Howard Wasserman, Law and Politics | Permalink | Comments (4)

Friday, April 24, 2015

On Anonymous Speech

When I drive into the BC parking lot, I'm always wary of the dad drivers with out-of-state plates.  Not just because they're lost, texting their kid to find the right dorm, and pushing the family dog into the back seat with the other arm (although also that).  It's because they're way more aggressive.  And heck, if I'm honest, I am probably way more courteous -- stopping for pedestrians, waiving ahead left-turners -- in that parking lot than I am when I'm away from home.  They know me, and who wants to face someone in the hall after you've just been rude to them on the road?  

Anonymity, in short, is a shield for our worst impulses.  We have a trove of data on this now.  Probably I could just say, at this point, Cf. The Internet.  But we have scientific studies, too.  Putting your name on a blog post or a letter to the editor is like the hand-drawn eyes in the office kitchen (reported by Thaler & Sunstein in Nudge, if you don't remember): it's a prompt to imagine how other people would respond if they observed us acting unkindly or unethically.  

I don't want to live in a community where everyone behaves like total strangers to one another, where moral obligations, norms of kindness and generosity of spirit and respect for disagreement can be shucked off.  I don't want to blog in a place like that.  And I don't want to vote in a place like that.  For that reason, I've argued against the use of charitable organizations as shields for the anonymity of political contributors.  And I have been very aggressively removing anonymous, spiteful comments from my threads during my time at prawfs.

Continue reading "On Anonymous Speech"

Posted by BDG on April 24, 2015 at 11:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (6)

Congratulations to Rick Garnett

The dean of Notre Dame Law School announced this week that our good friend and co-blogger Rick Garnett has been approved by the university administration as the law school's newest endowed professor. Rick will be the Schierl/Fort Howard professor at the Law School. I know Rick will be particularly pleased because the chair's previous occupants were two giants at Notre Dame: the great legal ethics scholar Tom Shaffer and the late Bob Rodes, who wrote lasting works in jurisprudence and many other areas. Both were friends and mentors to Rick, and I'm sure that it means the world to him to follow in their footsteps. Rick is a prolific scholar and public commentator, a much-loved teacher, and a total mensch--and, last but least, an active blogger, both here and at Mirror of Justice. The honor is well deserved. Mazel tov, buddy!

Posted by Paul Horwitz on April 24, 2015 at 11:35 AM in Paul Horwitz | Permalink | Comments (0)

Repost: First Annual Civil Procedure Workshop

The first annual Civil Procedure Workshop will be held at Seattle University School of Law on July 16-17, 2015.

Continue reading "Repost: First Annual Civil Procedure Workshop"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 24, 2015 at 10:28 AM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Forum selection, upside-down

The family of Michael Brown has filed a civil rights action against the City of Ferguson, the former Chief of Police, and Darren Wilson. The complaint is a bit confusing. It appears to assert multiple individual, supervisory, and Monell counts for Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment violations, including a claim for loss of familial relationship under the Fourteenth Amendment, as well as excessive force. The complaint goes after Ferguson's larger patterns-or-practices of unconstitutional behavior, describing events going back as far as 2010. At the same time, the introduction describes it as a wrongful death action under Missouri law for violations of the U.S. and Missouri constitutions, even though the state Constitution is never mentioned again and no torts (battery, whatever) are asserted.

It is noteworthy--and puzzling--that the family filed in state rather than federal court. There is nothing state-based about the legal rights actually asserted in the Complaint; this is a straight-forward § 1983 claim asserting federal constitutional rights. The idea behind federal question jurisdiction was to offer parties the expertise and respect for federal law and federal rights that federal judges offer, as well as the freedom to protect those rights that comes with Article III protections. And that idea takes on special importance when asserting constitutional claims against local governments and local government officials that only became possible with the Fourteenth Amendment, where federal judges are insulated from the local pro-government pressures that might work against civil-rights plaintiffs. Indeed, arguments against congressional jurisdiction-stripping always have fought against the bogeyman of plaintiffs forced to pursue federal constitutional rights against local government institutions before an uninsulated local judiciary.* Has federal judicial procedure--Twiqbal, summary judgment, limits on discovery--become so hostile to civil rights plaintiffs and so pro-defendant that plaintiffs would prefer to litigate against a local government in state court? Consider that the two biggest hurdles that § 1983 plaintiffs regularly face--qualified immunity and the heightened demands for making a Monell claim--follow them into state court anyway. So why pick state over federal in this type of case?

Addition: Note that I am assuming the choice was strategic rather than familiar. The three lawyers on the case include one attorney from Clayton, MO and two from Tallahassee. The web site for the latter two indicates that they largely specialize in personal injury and automobile accident cases, although Civil Rights is listed as a practice area. I cannot find anything about the local attorney (who has been in front of the media since the fall). If all three are primarily PI lawyers who primarily litigate in state court, the choice of forum might simply have been an automatic move rather than a deliberate choice based on specialized understanding of § 1983 litigation.

The interesting question is whether the defendants remove, seeing as how they might see themselves as being in an advantageous position in either court.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 23, 2015 at 03:47 PM in Civil Procedure, Constitutional thoughts, Howard Wasserman, Law and Politics | Permalink | Comments (14)

How Things Have Changed

Dunce that I am, I set too big a topic for our anniversary posts this week: how law teaching, and law schools, have changed since PrawfsBlawg got started ten years ago. That's a book, not a blog post.

And yet...Although one could say a lot about this topic, on second thought I wonder if things have really changed that much. The environment in which law schools operate has changed dramatically, to be sure. And there have been interesting innovations in plenty of places--some for the good, others perhaps not so much. There have been important changes in how one becomes a law professor, but I'm not sure that who becomes a law professor has really changed: it's more a case of same cohort, different route. And if one asks the fundamental, global question--have law schools, taken as a whole, changed significantly in the last decade?--I find myself more inclined to answer "no" or "not much" than "yes." In one sense this is not a surprise. One can always count on institutional inertia. At the same time, given all the changes that are arguably necessary, and all the incentives to change, I find myself struck, if not actually surprised, at how little transformation there has been on the whole. 

I can't or at least won't try to justify that conclusion in any detail. Instead, let me offer a few bite-sized observations about interesting changes I have seen. I hope to have the energy and diligence to discuss several changes over several posts, but I'll start with just one. Perhaps the most interesting change, from my perspective as a teacher, is the backward-and-forward shifts in the student body that I have seen, especially since 2008. I taught Legal Profession, aka legal ethics, throughout this period. Unsurprisingly, it turned out to be the best of my classes for learning something about students' attitudes toward law school and legal practice, in a way that distinctly altered my approach to the course.

Continue reading "How Things Have Changed"

Posted by Paul Horwitz on April 23, 2015 at 01:50 PM in Paul Horwitz | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law School Sustainability 2015

In late 2012, I put up a post entitled "Law School Sustainability."  I argued that law schools had to think seriously about making legal education sustainable by making it a worthwhile endeavor for graduates.  Two and a half years later, sustainability has become even more of an imperative than a choice.  It is not an exaggeration to say that some schools are struggling to stay in existence, and that most schools have had serious challenges to their operations.  This December 2014 NYT article provided not only an overview of this situation -- it also provided a source for law school deans in convincing university administrations (or, for stand-alones, their boards) that the problems at their particular law school were not unique.  "See?  Even Northwestern is having these issues!"

There are two blunt forces that are channeling the deluge of changes on law schools today: money and the U.S. News rankings.  Money is pretty straightforward: a school needs enough students to pay enough in tuition to cover the costs of operating the school.  Schools will have various abilities to cover shortfalls.  But a school at least needs to pay for itself to be sustainable.  So money is pushing schools to take more students at higher tuition rates -- or, to cut costs to make up the shortfall.  U.S. News, however, pushes in almost the opposite direction.  It puts pressure on schools to take fewer students, to pay more money per student in educational expenses, and to cut tuition to get better credentialed students.  (Ted Seto made this point yesterday, in discussing tuition sustainability.)  So schools have played the game of ping-ponging back and forth between these two forces, depending on their finances.

Continue reading "Law School Sustainability 2015"

Posted by Matt Bodie on April 23, 2015 at 11:26 AM in 10th Anniversary, Life of Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (2)

Additional thoughts on Wong and June and the FTCA

I have a SCOTUSBlog opinion analysis on Wednesday's decision in U.S. v. Wong (along with U.S. v. June). A  divided Court (Kagan writing the majority, for Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, and Sotomayor) held that the statute of limitations in the Federal Tort Claims Act is not jurisdictional and is subject to equitable tolling.

This is the right conclusion--both that the statute is not jurisdictional and that it is subject to equitable tolling. But I have some additional thoughts after the jump.

Continue reading "Additional thoughts on Wong and June and the FTCA"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 23, 2015 at 09:53 AM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman, Law and Politics | Permalink | Comments (2)

The First Amendment and the Redskins’ Trademark, Part II: A Shot Across the Bow from the Federal Circuit

The following post is by Christine Haight Farley and Robert L. Tsai  (both of American); it is their second guest post on the Washington Professional Football Team trademark case. It is cross-posted at the Sports Law Blog.

On Tuesday, the Federal Circuit issued a unanimous decision (In re Tam) holding that the mark THE SLANTS was properly refused registration because it is disparaging to people of Asian descent.  Since 2010, Simon Shiao Tam, the front man for the Asian-American rock band “The Slants,” has been trying to obtain trademark recognition for the name of his band.  The record shows that the band picked the name by thinking of “things that people associate with Asians. Obviously, one of the first things people say is that we have slanted eyes.”  The record of the case confirmed that “slants,” used in the way proposed, would likely be received as a racial slur.

The fact that the registrant wished to re-appropriate an ethnic slur and try to create a positive connotation did not alter the outcome. Nor was the Court troubled that the user’s own race formed part of the background for assessing the objective meaning of the mark in commerce. Both of these jurisprudential choices are consistent with the Federal Circuit’s approach to statutory interpretation, which strives for an objective meaning of trademarks in actual use.  In our view, the private cooptation of illiberal ideas can generate terrific art and might very well help to change social meaning in the long run.  But you don’t need trademark protection to engage in such projects of appropriation; indeed, granting one user legal protection might even stifle others who would like to experiment further with taboo ideas.

Continue reading "The First Amendment and the Redskins’ Trademark, Part II: A Shot Across the Bow from the Federal Circuit"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 23, 2015 at 09:01 AM in Constitutional thoughts, First Amendment, Intellectual Property | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

More IP Prawf Lateral Moves...

In addition to the four additions to Texas A&M discussed here, Scott Hemphill (Columbia) will be joining NYU Law (the announcement is here). In addition, Ann Bartow (Pace) will be joining the University of New Hampshire School of Law as the Director of the Franklin Pierce Center for Intellectual Property (this announcement is here). Congratulations!

Posted by Amy Landers on April 22, 2015 at 10:01 AM in Intellectual Property | Permalink | Comments (0)

A (very) brief note on law employment statistics

You, reader, are in the wrong place for the debate over how law schools should present employment data.  Mike Simkovic has a long series of posts (I link here just to the latest, which in turn includes links to the earlier work), and Bernie Burk has weighed in here and here.  To digest, Mike says that it is reasonable for law schools to report "unemployment" figures using standard BLS definitions, which include part-time workers and workers employed outside law as employed.  Bernie says this is potentially misleading, since applicants probably also would like to know what share of the employed are full-time or in JD-required jobs.  Mike notes that the definition of unemployment can be googled (probably by an 8th-grader, but he says "by a college graduate") pretty easily -- a step, I might add, that might reasonably be expected of someone who is relying on data to decide how to spend 3 years of their life.  

I write this post, though, because for whatever reason Mike hides his best response to Bernie's point at the bottom of a long post: "There is a distinction between the potential for additional information to be useful and the stronger claim that summary information is inherently misleading."

Posted by BDG on April 22, 2015 at 09:41 AM in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (74)

CFP: Eighth Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop

The University of California, Irvine School of Law will host the Eighth Annual Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop on September 11-12, 2015.  The workshop pairs a senior scholar with a panel of junior scholars presenting works-in-progress.  Confirmed senior scholars include, at this time, Erwin Chemerinsky (UCI Law), Evan Lee (UC-Hastings), Thomas Lee (Fordham), Carrie Menkel-Meadow (UCI Law), James Pfander (Northwestern), and Joan Steinman (IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law).

Continue reading "CFP: Eighth Junior Faculty Federal Courts Workshop"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 22, 2015 at 09:31 AM in Civil Procedure, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

#StopTrolls

In the marketplace of ideas, Twitter has decided that online trolls are bad for business. Back in February, it was reported that Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo told staff "We lose core user after core user by not addressing simple trolling issues that they face every day." This statement suggested that keeping Twitter safer from abusers had become a corporate goal.

Recently, Twitter began to roll out changes that puts meaning behind Costolo's statement. Rather than asking the victim to track down an abuser, Twitter has flipped the script to test a new a feature to lock the abuser's account for a period of time. The account can be reactivated if the user provides a phone number verification, and then deletes all of the tweets that are in violation of terms of service. A screen shot of the procedure is below (and a text explanation is here on Ars Technica).

Twitter_image_-_locked

Additionally, Twitter's guidelines have been amended to broaden the definition of prohibited conduct to include "threats of violence against others or promot[ing] violence against others" (expanded from the “direct, specific threats of violence against others” in the former policy). In addition, the company is implementing measures to limit distribution of certain tweets that exhibit "a wide range of signals and context that frequently correlates with abuse including the age of the account itself, and the similarity of a Tweet to other content that our safety team has in the past independently determined to be abusive."

The sheer size and volume of Twitter's platform, and the types of distinctions that will have be made, make implementation of these standards a challenge. Of course, the platform is in the private sector, and these guidelines are a form a type of private governance. I wonder where this direction will take the company, what the impact will be on public discourse, and whether it will affect the behavior of other online platforms.

Posted by Amy Landers on April 21, 2015 at 08:32 PM in Blogging, Culture, Current Affairs, Information and Technology | Permalink | Comments (0)

A Human Right to Intellectual Property?

The merger between trade and intellectual property, referred to as “strange bedfellows” in the 1990’s, has become the norm as a result of the WTO Agreement on Trade-related Intellectual Property Rights, and subsequent agreements. Intellectual property and human rights may seem like strange bedfellows as well. However, there is a greater connection between these two areas of law than one might imagine.

Article 27(2) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) provides that “everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.” The International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights contains similar language. A number of scholars have considered the relationship between human rights instruments and intellectual property rights (i.e. Helfer, Yu, Shaver, Land, Chapman, Carpenter, and others). Some (Chapman, for instance) have suggested that this UDHR provision provides a basis for a human right to copyright or patent protection.

Writing on corporations and the possible human right to intellectual property, I found myself reluctant to accept the notion of a right to intellectual property as a human right. I like the idea of considering the impact of intellectual property rights on human rights, as has been done in the access to medicines debate, for instance. However, I am generally uncomfortable with the notion of a human right to intellectual property. Equating the UDHR human right to a right to copyright or patent protection raises a number of issues, and I doubt that it is ultimately a good idea. However, I am willing to be convinced otherwise. 

Posted by Jan OseiTutu on April 21, 2015 at 01:16 PM in Corporate, Culture, Intellectual Property, International Law | Permalink | Comments (2)

All is Vanity.

I’ve enjoyed the set of recent reflections on Prawfs’ astonishing ten-year run.  Orin's great insights about blogging’s lack of internal credit & Paul’s characteristically wise post about the aging medium both hit points I would’ve written if I were faster on the draw, and smarter.  Or perhaps not. Like Paul, I’m increasingly averse to writing about the medium, or about legal education itself.  So these recap posts scratch an itch that perhaps ought to be  left alone. Indeed, it feels far too often that most law blogging by professors is a less rigorous version of the Journal of Legal Education, or worse (?) an unending and unedifying list of law professor dean searches.

Why, I wondered, has the energy left the building? 

  1. Because there are fewer fans.  This is most of it.  Prawfs started in the seven years of hiring plenty, and we’re now deep in the middle of the seven years of drought.  There are many fewer young law professors than there were in 2005, and those few that remain are well-advised to keep their heads down and do what’s necessary to survive increasingly difficult internal climbs to tenure. Prawfs' and like blogs' rise  had many parents, but a hiring glut has to take place of pride.
  2. Because of status and everything that comes with it.  When Prawfs began it looked possible that academics from elite institutions would join the fray. That’s – by and large – not what happened. True, there are some faculty blogs at Chicago and elsewhere, and some subject-matter-specific  blogs where elite academics occasionally deign to write.  But very few academics from top ten schools blog regularly. That means: (1) blogs are still largely written by those who’ve not yet “arrived”; (2) bloggers generally work at schools with worse employment numbers, which makes them embarrassed to noodle in public; (3) it’s harder to move the needle on public conversations (excepting, as always, the VC, which is sui generis); (4) institutional support for blogging is resource-constrained. (See #5.)
  3. Because the party is elsewhere.  You may have noticed that Concurring Opinions, my home, has been relatively quiet of late.  But have you read Frank Pasquale’s twitter feed (7000+ followers).  Or, better yet, followed Dan Solove’s LinkedIn privacy forum (~900,000 followers!!)?  LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, etc. are where the action is. People read law professor blogs, by-and-large, to learn who has died, who is moving to what schools, and to guesstimate if their article will be accepted.  Also, there are recipes.
  4. Because of preemption.  Everything has been written before, including this sentence. Law professors care more than most about preemption. The weight of past posts is starting to press on our heads, no?
  5. Because we didn’t innovate.  Again, generalizing, blogs have remained stagnant in form.  That wasn’t inevitable. But even blogs about cutting edge topics are conventionally organized. Economy plays a large role here – as do law schools’ IT support, which has other fish to fry. Just a for-instance: compare Stanford Law’s fantastic landing page to a blog they’ve nested inside. Get the sense that the money for the renovation started to run out at some point?  Being stuck in a reverse-chron, wordpress, format has meant that symposia can “disorienting” and unwelcoming to outsiders. At Temple, I’ve been pushing hard against the trend, and we’ve started a business law newspaper using Hive, a nice wordpress-based platform that at least looks fresh. But if law professors wanted to be unconventional, technologically-savvy, innovators, they wouldn’t have become law professors.

All of this makes me feel wistful, because I remember when Prawfs (and Co-Op) started and the medium felt both transformative and exciting.  Blogging has been amazing for me professionally.  A post – and Dan Kahan’s generosity in response to it -  got me involved with the cultural cognition project. Many other articles started as half-baked pieces of dreck at various blog homes. It’s also been great personally, as I met many of my better friends in the academy through Prawfs or CoOp or the Conglomerate, making conferences less overwhelming, and knocking down disciplinary and subject-matter barriers.

But all things change. I am optimistic about the future of law, the legal academy, and public conversations about both – I just don’t think the future will be blogged.

Dan Markel could be an exhausting friend, and I didn’t always have the energy to talk with him. In the weeks before his death, I’d put off a conversation long overdue.  On July 17, 2014, I texted him to prompt that phone call, asking “what’s new with you.”  Later that day, he texted back, writing, “Lots. Will call shortly.”  I’m sorry we didn’t get to have that call. I’m sorry that he’s not around to celebrate this anniversary. He would’ve found my pessimism about professor blogging silly, and would have, I think, expressed enthusiasm and optimism I don’t currently feel about the future of Prawfs and law blogging more generally. Even if I'm right - and the glory of blogging is behind us - it's still worth recognizing that Prawfs has chugged along for a decade, adding tremendous value in the academy, largely because of his initiative and spirit.  

Posted by Dave Hoffman on April 21, 2015 at 11:33 AM in 10th Anniversary, Blogging | Permalink | Comments (7)

Monday, April 20, 2015

Johnson Argument on Vagueness—and Plea Bargaining?

Today the Supreme Court held argument on whether the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act is vague, not vague, or subject to a saving construction. Early on, Justice Alito asked a question that I think is at the heart of the case--namely, “whether the statute is unconstitutionally vague or whether this Court’s interpretations of the statute create the basis for a vagueness argument?” Or, as I’ve put it before, Who made a vague law vague? (For his part, Justice Alito seemed skeptical that "a statute [can] be vague simply because this Court messes it up.")

In this post, I will set aside the main vagueness debate to highlight a surprising aspect of the argument: the Chief Justice’s concern about prosecutorial overreaching during plea bargaining. This issue is becoming a theme for the Chief—and could have important implications.

Continue reading "Johnson Argument on Vagueness—and Plea Bargaining?"

Posted by Richard M. Re on April 20, 2015 at 03:03 PM | Permalink | Comments (4)

Chanel and Mrs. Jones

Last fall, fashion house Chanel filed a trademark action against hairstylist Chanel Jones (discussed here at The Fashion Law), to prevent Jones from using her first name in connection with her business. The case was notable given the relative size of the parties and the distance between their markets--Jones' hair salon is in Merrillville, Indiana, which seems more than a stone's throw from the Rue Cambon in Paris which Chanel calls home. Why bother? 

Moreover, the press' attention was undoubtedly caught by the fact that the company filed suit against an owner using her first name for her business, which is a common practice for personal service concerns. As Gene Quinn remarked in a different context, "How crazy would it be if you couldn’t even use your own name on your store front?" Well, as this survey of the case law by Christopher Bussert points out, in the past courts have enjoined companies from using their founder's name on their products and/or services when a senior (read: prior) user has established rights to the same name. 

As background, since the 1960's, Chanel (or alternatively Shanelle) has become an increasingly popular first name.

Chanel name popularity

Continue reading "Chanel and Mrs. Jones"

Posted by Amy Landers on April 20, 2015 at 12:05 PM in Intellectual Property | Permalink | Comments (0)

A Few Thoughts on Johnson v. United States and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine

While most Court watchers are gearing up for the same sex marriage cases, I’ve been eagerly awaiting this morning’s argument in Johnson v. United StatesJohnson is an odd case.  The Supreme Court originally granted cert on the narrow issue whether possessing a short-barreled shotgun qualifies as a violent felony under the Armed Career Criminal Act.  The parties briefed that issue and argued it before the Court.  But then, rather than deciding the case, the Justices set the case for re-argument and asked the parties to brief whether a portion of the ACCA is unconstitutionally vague.

Over at SCOTUSBlog, Rory Little has a very good overview of the case. He also summarizes the Solicitor General’s brief on the vagueness issue, calling it a “tour de force.”  I agree with Little that the government’s brief is quite good.  But I wanted to take a quick minute to articulate what I see as a relatively significant oversight in the Solicitor General’s analysis.

Continue reading "A Few Thoughts on Johnson v. United States and the Void for Vagueness Doctrine"

Posted by Carissa Byrne Hessick on April 20, 2015 at 11:47 AM in Criminal Law | Permalink | Comments (6)

ADA at 25, Chicago style

On Friday, I had the good fortune of attending the kick off event for ADA25Chicago.  There are a lot of celebratory events and academic conferences planned this year commemorating the 25th anniversary of the ADA, but this was different.  It brought together politicians (including Dick Durbin and Tammy Duckworth), corporate figures (including the President/COO of Motorola, where the event was held), and civic leaders (including representatives of the Chicago Community Trust), as well as state and local government.  These individuals did not just give speeches, but expressly set the stage for actual commitments.

The organizers had already gathered pledges from Chicago civic organizations and employers to establish programs to advance opportunities for people with disabilities, to create programs within six months throughout the region to increase civic engagement around disability issues, and to develop lasting “legacy projects” around the key themes of employment, education, and community living for people with disabilities.   ADA25Chicago has already planned a visible presence sponsoring events at Chicago’s many summertime festivals and cultural events (disability awareness, good food, and craft beer?  Count me in!).  And there are specific plans in place to hold these groups publicly accountable for their commitments.

I posted earlier about the disconnect between how those inside and outside the disability rights community view disability issues.  ADA25Chicago is one of the most sophisticated efforts I have ever seen to address that gap.  By gathering elites, and creating a plan to mobilize and hold their feet to the fire on accountability, this was a really exciting beginning.  I really look forward to watching how this all unfolds. 

 

Posted by Michael Waterstone on April 20, 2015 at 10:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Anniversary Topic # 3: How law teaching and law schools have changed

We now turn to our Third Anniversary Mini-Symposium: How has being a law professor, and law schools more generally, changed in the past ten years?

Topics might include:

• Changes in the profession.
• Trends in scholarship or teaching 
• The law school "crisis"
• More specifically, how were things different between the period before 2008, the economic period of crisis (including law school crisis) around 2008-2012, and the post-2012 era, in which there is still crisis but many or most students entering law school are well aware of it. I find a great difference between students who entered or graduated between 2009 and 2012 or so, who came to law school with one set of expectations and left them with very different expectations and often no job, and were embittered by it, and the newest students, who have a more pragmatic and much more chastened set of expectations and goals around law school. 
• How different these changes are from changes in the rest of the academy, or whether the law school exceptionalism about this is not actually so great. In this I'd be especially interested to hear from guests or permanent bloggers with PH.D.'s or connections to other disciplines and faculties, who can talk about their experience in both law and some other faculty or sector of the academy. 
• Changes in civility and in your dealings with students, commenters, and others.
• The rise of the VAP and other fellows.
 
Again, unsolicited posts can be sent to Paul or to me.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 20, 2015 at 08:01 AM in 10th Anniversary, Blogging, Howard Wasserman | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Legal Academic Blogging and Influence vs. Credit

Back in 2005, I predicted the following future for academic law blogging:

A continued increase in the overall amount of law blogging until we reach a natural equilibirum, and then a roughly constant amount of blogging with frequent turnover among active law bloggers. Here's my thinking. Right now law blogs are pretty new, and the number of law bloggers is increasing. But it's much easier to start a blog than to keep it up. A typical post might take an hour or so to research, write, and edit. And the better and more thoughtful the post, the more time it takes. Only so many people are willing to put in those hours on a regular basis, and members of that twisted elite group presumably will change over time, too.

 Among law professor blogs, the big variable would seem to be whether blogs eventually will be taken more seriously in the scholarly community than they are now. Right now most lawprof bloggers do it for fun, but don't consider blogging "real work." If this changes, I think it will transform the nature of law blogs considerably. Whether that would be a good thing or a bad thing is an open question.

I think the prediction in my first paragraph mostly came true, and pretty quickly, although there has been somewhat less turnover than I expected.  

As for the "big variable" of the second paragraph, I think the answer depends on what it means for blogs to be "taken more seriously."  Over time, we have learned that lawprof blogs are great for influence but not for credit.  By "influence," I mean influence on debates both within legal academia and in the broader legal and judicial community.  A lot of people read blogs. Legal blogs can help shape how those communities think about particular legal problems.  We saw that possibility in 2005, and I think that potential has been often realized in the decade since.  In that sense, blogs are now taken seriously. 

On the other hand, it turned out that lawprof blogging doesn't generate much internal credit within the legal academic world.  

Continue reading "Legal Academic Blogging and Influence vs. Credit"

Posted by Orin Kerr on April 19, 2015 at 11:36 PM in 10th Anniversary | Permalink | Comments (9)

Deferred Prosecution Agreements: Right Problem, Wrong Fix

Yglesias has a good write-up of the problems with regulating big financial firms, but he (and Elizabeth Warren) get to the wrong solutions. 

Continue reading "Deferred Prosecution Agreements: Right Problem, Wrong Fix"

Posted by BDG on April 19, 2015 at 05:28 PM in Article Spotlight, Criminal Law | Permalink | Comments (7)

Lateral hires and PrawfsBlawg

Brian Leiter's updated list of tenured lateral moves features several from the Prawfs community. Steve is going to University of Texas in 2016 (where he and former GuestPrawf Bobby Chesney will have the national security market cornered).  Current guest Brian Galle is moving from BC to Georgetown. And another former GuestPrawf, Aaron Bruhl, is headed from Houston to William & Mary.

Congratulations and good luck to all.

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 19, 2015 at 10:03 AM in Howard Wasserman, Teaching Law | Permalink | Comments (3)

When blogging (and bloggers) get old

Let me try to pick up on some of the issues that Paul, Dave, Rick, and Kate raise in their symposium posts.

I explained in my first symposium entry how I have used blogging in my time here. Although I have not gone back to review  seven years of posts, I do not believe my writing here has changed all that much either in quantity or in content (law v. life, serious legal issues v. pop-culture asides).* This may be because I have not taken on as many administrative responsibilities as Rick and Paul have (I have never served as an associate dean, for example), so I have not lost the time to devote to writing here. And since I wrote less about legal education and law schools than Paul did, I probably became less disillusioned than he by the tenor of the discussion.

* Although to be frank, I have written so many posts here that I do not remember a lot of what I have written. I have on occasion reviewed old posts and thought, "Did I write this? And did I really mean that at the time?"

Continue reading "When blogging (and bloggers) get old"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 19, 2015 at 09:59 AM in 10th Anniversary, Blogging, Howard Wasserman | Permalink | Comments (1)

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Eleventh Circuit flunks Civ Pro

We just started Erie last week and one of my students found this Eleventh Circuit decision from March. The Erie analysis (at pp. 25-31) is so utterly ridiculous and facile as to make me wonder if any of the judges (or their clerks) ever took Civ Pro. (Note: The conclusion is right; it's the analysis that would warrant an F on an essay exam).

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 18, 2015 at 06:40 PM in Civil Procedure, Howard Wasserman | Permalink | Comments (10)

An Appreciation of Legal Blogging (and Twitter!)

Last month, I had the pleasure of being a guest blogger here.  This month, I have read with interest and surprise the recent lamentations of legal blogging posted by some of the founders and earliest adopters of the medium.  I was particularly affected by Paul Horowitz’s post on PrawfsBlawg.  His comments on anonymous commenters seem particularly thoughtful and apt.  On the other hand, I felt myself defending (in my own head) blogging and Twitter culture while reading his criticisms.

 As a junior scholar, I have found the opportunity to read PrawfsBlawg immensely gratifying and educational.  I write and think about criminal justice. I am willing (if not happy) to admit that the volume of dense and rigorous scholarship I want to and must consume in order to write my own articles essentially prevents me from reading important, rigorous, and dense scholarship in other areas – first amendment law, education law, and international law, just to name a few.

But, while I can’t find the time to read 25,000 words about, say, the right to privacy versus the first amendment right to expression, I can certainly read and digest Amy Landers’ recent post about a New York Appellate court’s dismissal of a complaint against a photographer for invading the privacy of children when he shoots “from the shadows of [his] home into theirs.”  I might even click on the hyperlink she provided and read the decision. 

Continue reading "An Appreciation of Legal Blogging (and Twitter!)"

Posted by Kate Levine on April 18, 2015 at 04:26 PM in 10th Anniversary, Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0)

"Get off my lawn!" -- or, how (my) law-blogging has changed

I like the title of Paul's 10th anniversary, "How has blogging changed?" post better than the one I chose. (Maybe I should have gone with this, from Grandpa Simpson.)  And, I think Paul captured well a lot of what I wanted to say, at least with respect to the question "how has my blogging changed."  

I started blogging, at Mirror of Justice, in 2004 (and came a bit late to the Prawfsblawg crew).  I used to post more often, and about more things.  I'm not sure why, but tenure, promotion, and a stint in administration seem to have coincided with (even if not caused) a kind of narrowing.  As Paul discussed, I think I'm more reluctant than I was before 2008 to blog about our law-teaching vocation, at least in part out of nervousness about being flamed in comments or elsewhere for being self-indulgent or omphaloskeptical.  And, I think I'm more hesitant than I was when I started about addressing politically charged, "hot button," or "culture war" issues of the day, including the law-and-religion area in which I write.  This trend puts me in a bit of a bind:  I'm getting uneasy and hesitant about blogging about (a) what I do and (b) what I write about.  I'm not sure what's left . . . Duke basketball (or Notre Dame football)?  Adverbs (and here)?  Skyscrapers?

But that's just me.  How has blogging, or law-blogging more specifically, changed?  Dave's right, I think:   It's become, in various ways, more "serious."  There's maybe a chicken-and-the-egg dynamic here:  Once the Supreme Court cited law blogs, helping to validate them as more than just vehicles for doodles and musings, it became possible -- and then, perhaps, expected -- that blog-content would shift toward being the kind of stuff that could be cited by the Supreme Court.  Thankfully, over the last ten years, other outlets have proliferated for the doodles, musings, clever quips, and ironic bon mots -- Twitter, Instagram, and (for the oldsters among us) Facebook.  I suppose, before long, these will be transformed by respectability, too, and we'll have to work harder on crafting Robert Jackson-esque (or KimKierkegaardashianian) tweets.       

Posted by Rick Garnett on April 18, 2015 at 09:34 AM in Rick Garnett | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 17, 2015

Reflections on Prawfs at 10: taking seriousness seriously

Inspired by Paul’s typically thoughtful and comprehensive response to the question Howard posed for this week—How has law blogging changed in the past ten years?—I’ll offer some much briefer reflections on this issue. One impression I have about how blogging has changed in the legal academy at least is that is has become more serious, both in the sense that people take it seriously and that the medium itself is more serious. The first trend is probably good but I’m less sanguine about the latter, as I explain below the jump.

Continue reading "Reflections on Prawfs at 10: taking seriousness seriously"

Posted by Dave_Fagundes on April 17, 2015 at 07:09 PM in 10th Anniversary, Blogging | Permalink | Comments (0)

No Country for Old Men: Blogging After a Decade

On this tenth anniversary of Prawfsblawg, I'd also like to think and talk a little about how blogging has changed in that period, at least from the perspective on one blogger. My answer is " it has changed for the worse," but I admit up front that much of this has to do with my own experience, and the simple fact of doing it for ten years. 

Continue reading "No Country for Old Men: Blogging After a Decade"

Posted by Paul Horwitz on April 17, 2015 at 11:04 AM in Paul Horwitz | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Measuring the Impact of Faculty Scholarship

Given the intensity of the reactions folks had about how to measure productivity, I’ve been a little hesitant to post my thoughts on impact.

So, in addition to the qualifications I previously mentioned, let me add that I think it may be impossible to quantify the impact of legal scholarship.  Indeed, I am uncertain how one goes about quantifying the impact of most things.  We could, for example, obviously state that the Mona Lisa has exerted a greater influence on art than the shabby art projects that I completed and my mother hung on our refrigerator.  But can we assess the impact of the Mona Lisa as compared to the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel?

To put this in terms of legal scholarship, I can confidently say that Holmes’ The Path of the Law has exerted a greater impact than any article that I have ever published (or will ever publish).  But how can we compare The Path of the Law to, for example, Warren & Brandeis’ The Right to Privacy?  We can count how many citations each article receives in Westlaw’s JLR database, we could count the court citations each has received, and we could even ask a bunch of respected law professors to vote which article they believe had a greater impact.  But the fact that Holmes’ article has 3,322 cites in JLR, while Warren and Brandeis have only 2,451 doesn’t seem to settle the question---or at least it doesn’t settle the question for me.

In any event, assuming that we have to come up with some way to measure impact---and that is a major premise of academic analytics---I suggest that we quantify the following for each faculty member:

Continue reading "Measuring the Impact of Faculty Scholarship"

Posted by Carissa Byrne Hessick on April 16, 2015 at 06:06 PM in Life of Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (10)

Ice cream Court of the United States

I missed this suggestion from a few weeks ago that Ben & Jerry's needed to name some flavors after women. Two proposals after the jump: Ruth Bader Ginger and Sonya [sic] Sotomayoreo Mint Cookie.

Continue reading "Ice cream Court of the United States"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 16, 2015 at 04:23 PM in Culture, Howard Wasserman | Permalink | Comments (1)

Multiple choice and formative assessment

The following is by Ben Spencer (Virginia) and is sponsored by West Academic.

The forthcoming ABA standards require law schools to pay better attention to how they assess student learning. Such assessment can not only measure student achievement after the conclusion of a unit or course (summative assessment), but can also be used as a tool to enhance the learning of the material throughout the course (formative assessment). Formative assessment permits students to determine their own level of understanding at a point when they can improve before the final exam and permits the instructor to discover areas of student weakness at a time when further training can still occur.

Continue reading "Multiple choice and formative assessment"

Posted by Howard Wasserman on April 16, 2015 at 08:31 AM in Sponsored Announcements | Permalink | Comments (2)

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The Yale School of Law and Super-Parenting

In case you were feeling accomplished for having gotten the kids to school on time this morning, Heather Gerken has written nine YA vampire novels for her tween daughter.  Gerken reports that her daughter "was never impressed that I was working full time, part of a two-career household and still outpacing J.K. Rowling by a considerable margin."   My favorite line of the article: "The women [in the book] are ambitious and career-oriented, and some have the emotional I.Q. of a tree frog."

Gerken joins fellow Yalies Ian Ayres and Amy Chua in showing us the ways to channel our inner achievers into the more mundane joys of parenting.  Ayres promised his children a puppy if they wrote and published an article in an academic peer-reviewed journal.  Lo and behold, they did.  And now they have Cheby, named for the mathematician that discovered Chebychev‘s inequality.  In January we got an update from the Tiger Mother herself as her teenage daughters sleep past noon.  I appreciate the introspection in constructing a pretty incisive self-parody, but since her shtick is how extreme she's willing to be, self-parody and honest reportage are a little difficult to differentiate.

Posted by Matt Bodie on April 15, 2015 at 02:54 PM in Culture, Life of Law Schools | Permalink | Comments (0)

Intellectual Property Conversations: International & Domestic

I think it is fair to say that international intellectual property is generally seen as distinct from general (i.e. domestic) intellectual property (IP), both in terms of scholarship and teaching. Thus, from what I gather, international intellectual property panels tend not to draw huge crowds during the annual IP scholars meetings. However, I see a fair amount of overlap between general IP scholarship and the international IP issues that some of us tend to explore. Among others, I see overlap when it comes to questions about the role of IP, the scope of IP rights, and whether the current international model and the mandated levels of intellectual property protection align with societal goals.

Writing international intellectual property scholarship requires an understanding of international law, and trade law in particular. This is due to the merger between trade law and intellectual property law that came about as a result of the World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property, commonly referred to as TRIPS. Post-TRIPS, there have been a number of other “trade-related” agreements that aim to protect intellectual property rights in the global arena. In addition to various bilateral trade agreements and investment treaties, there are multilateral agreements that have chapters or provisions on intellectual property. These include the Anti-counterfeiting Trade Agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.  The two latter agreements are currently being negotiated.  

There are complexities to the international discussion insofar as it involves some analysis of international legal obligations. However, the intellectual property aspects often address similar issues to those raised by some of the domestic scholarship. The articles discussed by Amy Landers and Dave Fagundes in their recent posts, for instance, are pertinent to some of the recurring themes in international intellectual property scholarship. Both international and domestic scholars might ask: what is the utilitarian calculus, and is society being well served? If not, is there some assumption (i.e. “faith”) that IP rights must be protected due to some natural entitlement? If so, is this beneficial to society or just to the IP producer? 

Those of us who write primarily on international IP issues can, and do, draw on domestic IP scholarship for our analysis of international issues. In this globalized economy, maybe it’s time for international IP scholarship to become more integrated into the mainstream so that there can be a greater exchange of ideas between general IP and international IP scholars. Making connections between domestic and international IP, where possible, can only enrich the conversation. 

Posted by Jan OseiTutu on April 15, 2015 at 02:17 PM in Intellectual Property, International Law | Permalink | Comments (0)